SEO for “Untouchable” Pages

In many occasions I’ve worked as search engine optimization specialist, I dealt with companies that didn’t have a website in the past. These are the companies that’s easier to work with, not because they don’t know much about search engine optimization (“SEO”) but they’re more likely to be receptive to my ideas.

SEO must be part of the web building process and not just an option when the site development is done. While it’s not bad to consider SEO after the site has been built, it could present complications through limitations imposed by a client:

SEO must be performed only on text content
It is assumed that after stress tests and copywriting reviews, a client feels that his site is already done and finished. But if it does not pass through an appropriate business research, usability tests and keyword research, the site could be up for another mini revamp.

However, some website owners are hesitant to commit to a full-scale optimization exercise because they feel that they’re doing the same thing all over again. Thus, SEO specialists and often prompted to scale down their checklists.

Page headers embedded in graphics are often retained for aesthetic reasons instead of shifting to a CSS-driven text headers.

Keyword research compromised
It is often assumed that once the site is built, its text content complies with copywriting guidelines. In return, these guidelines are typically governed by conventional wisdom that whatever appears on competitor website or what’s easily understandable by visitors are the easiest pathways to getting the job done.

Keyword research doesn’t mean making terms more complicated and more than just putting one more dot to connect for content developers. Without adequate analytics measurement process, the importance of keyword research is placed in the sidelines.

Technical bindings
When the site is finished, it is also understood that everything in the backstage is set up. From domain name registration to web hosting to .htaccess settings everything is often thought of as ideal once the page displays properly without much waiting to do.

We hope that the thought was right but in many instances in my experience doing such SEO reviews, this aspect is never a flawless one. And when I confide the issues to website owners, they are either adamant for change or are simply held by contracts or technical difficulties which makes implementations of SEO changes difficult, if not impossible.

Conclusion
I strongly vouch for SEO to be outlined in the roadmap with any website revamp. This makes the job for system administrators, programmers, designers and marketing people easier and hopefully achieve goals at a more reasonable amount of time.