Geo-Targeted LCD Screens for HK Taxis

Media reports that Mantise Media, a digital out of home company will now provide geo-targeted advertising solutions via taxi cabs.

Now, move over crab and airplane models.

crab-in-cab

LCD screens will be attached to taxi tops and each is equipped with a GPS technology that allows alteration of LCD display based on current location of a taxicab equipped with such facility. Think of it as similar to Google AdWords geographical preference feature, only that you are not staring at your computer or smartphone screen.

cab-airplane

When my taxi passes by Wan Chai, its LCD screen might displays ads by Burger King in Wan Chai or Optical 88’s Queensway shop when it reaches Admiralty. People near my taxi will see the ads.

Target Clients
These are possible target clients based on geographic location.
Central – Lan Kwai Fong and Soho restaurants, ifc mall tenants, premium office providers
Tsim Sha Tsui – HK Space Museum, HMV, Adidas flagship store
Admiralty – British Council, AMC Cinema
Causeway Bay – Bonjour, Excelsior Hotel’s Talk of the Town, Times Square shops

I think this is a brilliant idea. Congratulations Fairwood and Sasa for being the first advertisers and being open minded to this new advertising platform. It pushes digital advertising further beyond the Web. But are LCDs placed on top of taxis big enough to be noticed? What about double decker buses? Taxis have more flexibility because they don’t follow routes. That should give static billboards a run for their money. Perhaps that’s too costly though.

I wonder how drivers will be paid. Will they be paid by the amount of time spent on displaying the ad? If this is so, there is a tendency that red taxis will be paid better than their Lantau or New Territories counterparts. I assume that most ads are targeted to locations of target daytime audience. They are mostly in Hong Kong island where office workplaces are located. I am curious as to how the whole system works. But for the moment, it’s great to have this one introduced in Hong Kong.

Photo credit: hooray_j, hooray_j