How to Earn Money Using Facebook Live Ad Breaks Feature

Have you noticed Facebook is aggressively promoting its Live feature? When a Facebook contact goes Live, a notification shows up, unlike other post updates like posting a rant, checking in or sharing a photo.

As it turned out, Facebook obviously has a plan: to turn this Facebook Live experience as an income generating activity to those who go on live using Facebook’s existing feature. Whether watching a concert, organizing a big gathering or an event, you can make money by allowing Facebook to insert commercial during ad breaks lasting up to 15 seconds long.

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What are the requirements?

Any Facebook user can take advantage of this money-making venture as long as he or she meets the minimum requirements when broadcasting Facebook Live.

  • He or she must have at least 2,000 followers. In the existing setting, followers don’t need to be your contacts, just those who wish to see your updates in their timeline.
  • Ad breaks can be enabled when any live broadcast has more than 300 people watching at the same time, once the broadcast has been on for at least four minutes.
  • Before taking an ad break, you may inform your audience you’ll be right back. Your camera will turn off, and an advertisement will be played. Viewers will see a counter in the screen corner letting them know when you’ll resume broadcasting.
  • Additional ad breaks are allowed every five minutes after the first break.

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How can I join in Facebook Ad Breaks?

Once you started your live broadcast, Facebook will send you a notification indicating that you are eligible to set up ad breaks, only if you meet the requirements stated above. Appearance of the notification would look like this:

You will also receive a dollar sign icon you can tap to activate ad breaks. Once you click on the icon, the ad breaks setup begins with the Getting Started on which you will need to review the terms.

How can I get paid in Facebook Ad Breaks?

You can setup a payment account through Paypal or bank account. Videos shown in ad breaks are from advertisers who wish to ride the bandwagon of Facebook Live and pay Facebook to do so.

Facebook, with its infrastructure and technology, intends to keep 45% of revenue while the remaining 55% goes to the Facebook Live broadcaster.

In case you have a payment account already:

  • Fill out all fields required in the Add Payment Account
  • Select payment option (PayPal or bank account)
  • Fill out additional form for taxable accounts (those living under jurisdiction that imposes tax on earnings from this and similar revenue streams). You will need to access your account from a desktop (not mobile) device to complete the process.

In case you already have a payment account, you can then start creating ad breaks.

What does this mean within the whole Facebook ecosystem?

  • Live videos may then turn from a free flowing to a predictable pace: videographers and broadcasters may defer the most exciting part of their video until after the ad break in their effort to qualify in the cash incentive.This might translate to broadcasts creating teaser videos in the first few minutes building towards the ad break and presenting the meat of the video after broadcasters get their advertising cut. Of course this is fine as long as both broadcasters (ad revenue) and their viewers (free video coverage) get what they expect to get.
  • Facebook might become more intrusive not only because more users try to make money from this mid-roll video revenue generator, but we have also noticed that Facebook has switched from muted videos by default to a noisier one.
  • Ad breaks not only offers financial incentive to broadcasters but also gives them time to make adjustments (change angle of the video, take a quick hairdo/makeup, change video settings).
  • With Facebook Ad Breaks doing all the legwork (accounting, hosting, etc), more aspiring videographers could move in towards Facebook platform. For example, with vertical video available, Snapchat users might be tempted to jump ship.

Facebook has always been clever in its initiatives to make money, even if some of those were unpopular such as throttling the number of Fans who can see the updates of Pages they like.

But not everyone outside of Facebook organization (management and staff) are frowning. As a public company, Facebook shareholders would be relieved the stocks they are holding on won’t go stagnant and will continue to grow.