Star for a Day

Ever since I joined the SEO forums, I never felt quite like a star, where people recognize me, or at least my posts. I seem to be obscure, quite seemingly hesitant to voice out  questions or reply to queries. But the longer I stayed, my confidence grew.

And while I do not know anyone personally, save for one Eastern European woman who settled in the US and sent me very long e-mails I myself could not cope, the people in the room are nice. Somehow I knew the character of behind each avatar so I kinda adjust what type of message to post especially when a certain personality is actively engaged in a thread.

I am active in HighRankings since May of last year and so far I think I am the 15th ranked active member in terms of post volume (excluding moderators) out of 11,000 plus members. I am a newbie at Search Engine Watch Forums and an ocassional eavesdropper at Matt Cutts’s blog.

High Rankings members are quite close and often collaborate in many aspects like speaking engagements, project partnerships or simply widening the social network. Search Engine Watch Forums is quite comprehensive but as a new comer I barely know anyone except the moderators who oversee certain sections and often reply to questions. Matt Cutts’s is more of an “anything goes” blog where people respond to a post by asking, refuting or perhaps to have their names read or links clicked.

Recently I felt I am a star in my own little way. Search Engine Watch’s Danny Sullivan paid attention to my post about the accuracy of Google Zeitgeist and placed it in an update of the site’s daily blog. High Rankings administrator Jill Whalen (Jill) was not amused by the look of my chosen avatar: Ralph Wiggum of The Simpsons pointing a finger onto his nose. We had fun in that one thread and I was resolved to changing it to my personal photo until another moderator Bob Gladstein (qwerty) defended the avatar as a symbol of one’s honesty and innocence into asking SEO questions in the thread. And regading Matt Cutts, he blogged about the visit of his parents around and he said he is trying to show them he is not workaholic. My single sentence indeed attracted his attention and replied it may not be possible to disprove the fact that he is workaholic because his parents are also Internet-savvy and read his blogs.

That’s me, a star for a day.